Our Latest Photos

Dreams Bliss Heather Mill Extra Virgin Calanque Old Desert Gull Mediterranean Forest of Masts Little Bird Wind Blown

View Our Entire Photostream

You Are Here: Updates > Two Martins’ Days at Augsburg College
Nov
15

Two Martins’ Days at Augsburg College

It has been a whirl­wind here and, strangely enough, harder to keep up with the blog than when we were walk­ing all day… I sup­pose because our daily tasks have more vari­ety than the pil­grim­age rhythm of walk, eat, write, sleep, and walk again.

We had a won­der­ful time at Augs­burg Col­lege in Min­neapo­lis dur­ing our visit for their Founders Day lec­tures, a series started a few years ago focus­ing on Ref­or­ma­tion the­ol­ogy as a way of empha­siz­ing Augsburg’s iden­tity as a Lutheran col­lege. The lec­tures were sched­uled for the 10th and 11th of Novem­ber, and not by coin­ci­dence: the 10th was Mar­tin Luther’s birth­day (527 years ago) and 11th is the feast day of St. Mar­tin of Tours, the sol­dier who shared his cloak with a beg­gar and also gave his name to the infant Luther bap­tized the day after his birth.

We were inter­ested to learn, inci­den­tally, that Augs­burg is the biggest of the ELCA col­leges and set in the most urban loca­tion of any of them. While it may not have the loveli­est cam­pus (though it does have exten­sion cam­puses in Wind­hoek, Namibia and Cuer­navaca, Mexico—how cool is that?!), it def­i­nitely impressed us as a vital place with lots of cool stuff hap­pen­ing all the time, and it’s turned its urban loca­tion into an asset as well as a mission.

So, last Wednes­day night Andrew gave his talk enti­tled “Pome­gran­ates, Passes, and Popes: A Kinetic View of Luther’s Pil­grim­age to Rome,” fan­tas­ti­cally illus­trated by pro­jec­tions of his pho­tos along the way. The Augs­burg crew is going to work on pro­duc­ing a video that inte­grates Andrew’s talk­ing with the slides going on behind him, so as soon as that’s done and on the Augs­burg site we’ll get a link up for you to watch.

If you’re dying of curios­ity, in the mean­while, what pome­gran­ates have to do with any­thing, they’re actu­ally the sole evi­dence that Luther’s trip took place in the fall of 1510 rather than the spring or sum­mer of 1511. (The prob­lem in the Augus­tin­ian order didn’t arise until late Sep­tem­ber 1510, and Luther was per­ma­nently trans­ferred to Wit­ten­berg in fall 1511, so those are the brack­ets on the pos­si­ble dates.) While trav­el­ing through the Po val­ley in Italy, Luther reported that he and his com­pan­ion got a ter­ri­ble fever—probably malaria—from leav­ing the win­dows open at night, and they were cured by that mirac­u­lous fruit of ancient leg­end, the pome­gran­ate. Back in the days before freez­ers and banana republics, pome­gran­ates were only in sea­son and avail­able for con­sump­tion in the fall: hence the dat­ing of Luther’s trip. We did notice lots of pome­gran­ate trees with fruit a-ripening dur­ing our Octo­ber pas­sage through Italy, though we never had to test them as a malaria cure.

Thurs­day morn­ing I gave my pre­sen­ta­tion, “What Has Erfurt to Do with Rome? Ecu­menism as a Pil­grim­age.” It did not, I regret to say, include any slides, but it should also be on video soon, and we’ll also paste in the link if you’d like to watch it. After­wards they had a very nice lun­cheon for us, and then we vis­ited our friend Hans Wiersma’s class on mar­riage and fam­ily. I sup­pose the stu­dents were curi­ous how a cou­ple could walk a thou­sand miles and still be mar­ried to each other! (Actu­ally, a num­ber of peo­ple gen­tly inquired how our mar­riage was managing—we are happy to say it was never in the slight­est peril.)

We had a lit­tle down time then with family—both of Andrew’s broth­ers and their fam­i­lies, plus Roger and Ginny back to nor­mal, non-claustrophic exis­tence in their house post-camper—and this morn­ing very bright and early we hopped our next plane down to North Car­olina to visit my alma mater, Lenoir-Rhyne in Hick­ory, as the “The­olo­gians in Res­i­dence” for the week. (We are hon­ored and not a lit­tle awed to be fol­low­ing in the foot­steps of Eric Gritsch and Robert Jen­son who were the The­olo­gians in Res­i­dence the last two years.) More news on that soon!

Be Socia­ble, Share!

Related Posts

One Response to Two Martins’ Days at Augsburg College

    Dee Fisher says:

    I would love to see/hear both your pre­sen­ta­tions online. I avidly fol­lowed your walk from about Sep­tem­ber on. Our pas­tor let the con­gre­ga­tion know about what you were doing, and, per­son­ally, I found it fas­ci­nat­ing to read how it is to walk like you did in mod­ern Europe.

    As for mar­riages last­ing 24/7 con­tact, my hus­band and I spent a month last sum­mer jour­ney­ing all over the Amer­i­can West, and I am happy to say that not only did our mar­riage sur­vive, we are eager to do a sim­i­lar trip again. It pays to marry your best friend, and we both did that.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Follow Us!

Facebook Twitter RSS Feed Email

Facebook Fans...

Tweets...

    Tags

    Italy Alps Friar church-dividing freedom grace St. Paul Rome Creeds Vatican 2 God German mystics Florence Finland cities 95 theses Otto Hermann Pesch Henri de Lubac Joint Declaration Coburg Vorarlberg Apennines Ambrose fasting Strasbourg Oettingen Institute for Ecumenical Research Rhine Freedom of a Christian mission Pentecostal relics language ecumenism St. Augustine prayer anti-Judaism Luther spiritual disciplines charismatic worship dialogue love John Wesley Australia Eisfeld Lent law and gospel miracle Protestant Staupitz promise Volker Leppin Vierzehnheiligen church Benedictine convergence differentiated consensus St. Augustine House mediator Nördlingen conversion Lombardy different traditions Zapfendorf reception spirituality Milan unity Bregenz amen Scripture Bamberg Nuremberg Melanchthon Renaissance Commentary on the Magnificat hiking marriage Unitatis Redintegratio penance Augustinian pilgrimage martyr Emilia-Romagna Kilian McDonnell Via Francigena Orthodox Liechtenstein Reformation Lutheran good works Holy Spirit theology of the cross Vaduz baptism monasticism Tuscany spiritual ecumenism marble specialization Austria Ten Commandments translation St. Peter monk Kempten Mortalium Animos Siena Calvin 8th commandment misunderstanding Johannes Tauler St. James Leuenberg Agreement Bach memmingen saints word Roanoke Wittenberg anti-Semitism Martin Luther Witness to Jesus Christ Advent Gutenberg Bernard of Clairvaux predestination Dante mysticism Ulm Mediterranean Cardinal Kasper Reformed Erfurt patience justification Baroque Thomas Aquinas Methodist righteousness faith sacraments Germany post-pilgrimage Santiago de Compostela Lutheran World Federation consensus Neresheim liturgy Large Catechism Week of Prayer for Christian Unity Mennonite university eucharist honesty canal gift ecumenical concepts nature of God Christ vernacular Sweden One Mediator Saints and Mary Babylonian Captivity Augustine Bavaria Allgäu Heidelberg Disputation Small Catechism Edinburgh Missionary Conference World Council of Churches Switzerland Lazio Baptism Eucharist and Ministry Augsburg Confession change Geneva Bible Apology to the Augsburg Confession Lutheran monks Robert Louis Stevenson Rick Steves walk Mary Jews Catholic rain Franciscan communion Anabaptist Dominican Confessions truth and love Biel Liguria Augsburg College sanctification Chiavenna forgiveness

    Brought to you by...

    ...you!